Through The Lens 103 – Antietam Memorial Illumination

Tomorrow (unless postponed by weather) is the 2017 edition of the Antietam Memorial Illumination.  I won’t be attending this year as I have other commitments, but I highly recommend anyone in the area making the trip to Sharpsburg to drive through the Battlefield.  The army of volunteers places one luminary on the battlefield for each casualty.  Antietam remains our bloodiest day in war with 23,110 casualties, a number that isn’t fully understood until you see it represented in candles.

More information here for those who wish to attend:  Antietam Memorial Illumination

Through The Lens 102 – Wabun and the J

The engineer eases off the throttle of N&W 611 heading into a speed restriction on the uphill grade outside the town of Wabun, VA.  This was the first of two trips out of Roanoke on Memorial Day 2016.

After Norfolk Southern ended its first steam program in 1994, many thought we’d never get to see the J under steam again.  Fortunately miracles happen and the Virginia Museum of Transportation restored 611 to service with the help of Norfolk Southern and many other generous donors.  I’m thankful to have had the opportunity to ride behind and photograph one of the finest steam locomotives ever built.  Even better, I got to photograph it with some good friends.  Thanks again, Kevin, Mike and Rick!

Through The Lens 99 – The Road to Paradise

The road to Paradise has long been the nickname for the Strasburg Railroad. Fitting name too since the line ran from Strasburg PA to Paradise, PA where it interchanged with with the Pennsylvania Railroad, now part of Norfolk Southern.

I’m headed to Strasburg again soon for a photo charter featuring N&W 475, which will be disguised as her sister locomotive #382.   N&W 382 was made famous by O. Winston Link in his photos of it operating on the N&W’s Abingdon Branch, but was lost to the scrapper’ torch.

Through The Lens 97 – Gettysburg Fall Color

Fall color from a day trip to Gettysburg a couple of years ago.  The purple wildflowers contrasted nicely with the reds and oranges of the fall foliage in the background.

Through The Lens 96 – Abandoned Workshop

Here’s one from the workshop in the basement of the Klotz Throwing Mill. When the mill was in operation, machinists would have worked in this space to keep the mill running.

I’m headed there again Sunday with Abandoned America.

Through The Lens 95 – Cass Fall Photography Workshop

This weekend, I’m attending the 2017 edition of the Cass Fall Photography Workshop.  While there isn’t a photo charter component this year, I’m happy that the night photo shoot will occur again this year.  The photo above is from the night session at last year’s workshop.  I can’t wait to see what Walter and Clayton have in store for us this year.

With any luck, I’ll post the photos from last year’s workshop in the next month.

Through The Lens 94 – Colonial Williamsburg Fall Color

Another from the archives.  This is one of those luck favors the prepared kind of moments.  A couple of years ago, Dad and I took a weekend photo trip to Colonial Williamsburg.  While we were there we stumbled into a video shoot for an upcoming TV commercial, allowing us to photograph part of Duke of Gloucester Street without any non-colonial inhabitants.

Through The Lens 93 – Horse Power!

Horse Power!

Here’s one from the Archives.  The Horse Pull at the Great Frederick Fair is a tradition the first Friday of the fair. While it is no longer held at the Grandstand, it is still a fun event.  It is incredible seeing the excitement of the horses as they approach the sled. These workhorse breeds are impressive equine athletes.

Trip Report – Klotz Throwing Company

Manufactured Reflections

The Klotz Throwing Company located in Western Maryland may be the last silk mill in America.  The mill once employed 300 people, taking raw silk from Japan and spinning it into thread which was shipped to New England to become textiles.  The mill closed in 1957 and has remained largely untouched since – one of those places where time truly stands still.

Herb Crawford purchased the mill in 1978 and continues to care for the factory to this day.  Unfortunately the roof is badly deteriorated so it may be a loosing battle.  Hopefully the mill will last long enough to be saved.

As I said in last Friday’s post, the Klotz Throwing Company has developed a wonderful patina and is full of wonderful photography opportunities.  I enjoyed every minute spent at the mill and am looking forward to another trip this fall.  Thanks again to Matthew Christopher of Abandoned America for arranging the tour and to Mr. Crawford for allowing us to visit.

Elevator Chair

Through The Lens 89 – Klotz Throwing Mill

Earlier this summer I had the opportunity to attend a photography workshop at the Klotz Throwing Mill, an abandoned silk mill in Maryland.  Closed since 1957, the mill has developed a wonderful patina and is full of photography opportunities.

Look for the full trip report on Tuesday.