Through The Lens 157 – Williamsburg Christmas

I didn’t make it down to Williamsburg this year to photograph the Christmas decorations but thought I’d share one from the archives. The creativity of the folks making the decorations is incredible.

Happy Friday!

Through The Lens 105 – Williamsburg Christmas Decorations

We’ll stick with the Williamsburg Christmas decorations this week.  While many of the decorations are elaborate, using a wide range of materials, some of my favorites like the one in the photo above are the simpler ones.

Through The Lens 104 – Colonial Williamsburg Christmas

Another from the archives.  A few years ago, a snow storm hit Williamsburg in late December.  It was after Christmas but before they take the decorations down in January.  It was an easy decision to make the four hour drive in the snow for this photography opportunity.

Through The Lens 13 – Year in Review

With the first post of the new year, I would like to thank everyone for stopping by and following along. As I’m writing this, I find that I’m way behind on editing images from trips to the Cass Scenic Railroad and Great Smoky Mountains National Park from this past fall. I hope to get those wrapped up and trip reports published in the near future.

The coming year looks exciting photographically with two railroad photo charters and an airshow already on the calendar and possibly a National Park trip somewhere in there as well.

Edit:  Due to user error technical difficulties, this post failed to publish as scheduled.

Through The Lens 10:  Colonial Christmas

Christmas in Williamsburg is a great time to visit Virginia’s Colonial Capitol.  Interestingly the decorations we enjoy there today are a 1940’s compromise between residents and the Colonial Williamsburg foundation. The residents wanted to decorate the homes in a modern manner but the Foundation wanted to keep to strict colonial traditions meaning no decorations.  They settled on decorating using only the natural materials that would have been on hand in colonial times. While the displays we see today would have been considered wasteful three centuries ago, they’re beautiful